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How to get started with Cryptocurrency trading…

1 May

CRYPTOCURRENCY TRADING

How to profit in the

Digital Currency Gold Rush

 

By

Si Rosser

 

Schmall World Publishing

First published in Great Britain as an e-book by Schmall World Publishing

Copyright © Simon Rosser 2018

 

The right of Simon Rosser to be identified as the author of the work has been asserted herein in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. All rights reserved.

This book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not, by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, resold, hired out or otherwise circulated without the publisher’s prior consent in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it is published and without a similar condition including this condition being imposed on the subsequent purchaser. British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data.

 

 

Disclaimer: The author is not a financial advisor or in any way giving financial advice within the pages of this book. Any cryptocurrency investments/purchases made after reading this book are done at the buyers own risk

 

 

Also by the same author;

The A-Z of Global Warming

Tipping Point – Robert Spire 1

Impact Point – Robert Spire 2

Melt Zone – Robert Spire 3

Cataclysm of the Ancients – Robert Spire 4

Red Mist – Espionage Thriller

Salient – SciFi Thrller

CHAPTER HEADINGS

Introduction

Chapter 1

Cryptocurrencies – What Are They?

Chapter 2

Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, Ripple and Bitcoin Cash

Chapter 3

What is a Blockchain?

Chapter 4

Altcoins – A Coin for Everyone and Everything

Chapter 5

Altcoin Search – Where Do You Start?

Chapter 6

Cryptocurrency Exchanges – Buying Ether and Bitcoin, Keeping it Simple!

Chapter 7

Strategies to Deploy

Chapter 8

Secret to Success – Eruption and Trigger Points

Chapter 9

ICO’s – Initial Coin Offerings Explained

Chapter 10

Wallets – Keeping Your Cryptos Safe

Conclusion

Recap, HODL and be Patient!

RISK and DISCLAIMER:

 

The information contained in this book is for educational purposes only. Any examples used are for educational and illustrative purposes. I am not recommending any particular Cryptocurrencies, ICOs or Blockchain technology. The names of any firms of Crypto Exchanges, financial institutions, wallets, financial websites or otherwise mentioned are for illustrative purposes only. The decision on which company to use if any, is at the total discretion of you, the reader. It is recommended that you seek your own professional financial advice before proceeding to invest in cryptocurrencies.

 

The world of Cryptocurrencies and ICOs is HIGHLY speculative and VOLOTILE and whilst large sums of money can be made, you can equally lose all your investments. Please read and understand the above and be aware of the risks of this kind of trading and investing.

 

By continuing to read this book you agree to the above and accept the extremely high risk nature of cryptocurrencies.

 

With those cautionary words over, let’s dive into the world of crypto!

 

INTRODUCTION

 

OKAY, SO YOU might be thinking what gives me the authority to write a book about cryptocurrency? And I wouldn’t blame you. I am a lawyer by profession and a part time author of 8 action-adventure thriller novels, and one reference book on global warming.

I’m also a self-taught cryptocurrency investor. Someone who knew nothing about Bitcoin or cryptocurrency in general until I started researching and immersing myself into the world of cryptocurrency after a good friend of mine in 2017 confirmed that his brother was heavily into it and making a lot of money. At the time I thought that I’d missed the boat. One Bitcoin back then was trading for about $3000 a coin. I thought no thanks, that’s clearly well over priced and apart from that I didn’t even understand what a Bitcoin was! Well, my big mistake was not looking into things further at the time. Shortly after I heard that another friend of mine in London had bought something called Ripple. With no idea what that was, in the latter half of 2017 I decided to start researching the entire world of cryptocurrency. I paid for cryptocurrency investment information, watched countless videos and read numerous articles and carried out hours of research. This book is the culmination of all of that. I only wish I’d taken more interest back in 2016 when my friend had first told me about his brother investing in Bitcoin, and some other exotic Altcoins that I’d never heard of. If I had, I’d probably be writing this book from my condo in Hawaii! But seriously, I use the term ‘investing’ loosely, as the cryptocurrency market is so volatile, and the landscape changing so rapidly, that anyone who knows anything about cryptocurrencies will tell you that you should only invest what you can afford to lose, and I can only reiterate that advice.

My aim in writing this book is to de-mystify the subject and hopefully provide you with the knowledge, confidence and tools to get started in investing in your first cryptocurrency coins. All you’ll need is a little patience and time to spend a few hours opening the necessary free trading accounts that are needed to buy and sell your coins, and you’ll be ready to jump into buying your first cryptos before you know it. I have to reiterate that I am in no way giving any investment advice or recommendations within this book as I am not a financial advisor or licenced by any kind of financial authority to do so, and you should always only invest what you can afford to lose (and I’m talking from starting with as little as a $50 stake like I did) but hopefully, with a bit of luck and judgement, you’ll have some fun and also make money along the way!

I aim to cut through the mysticism and incredibly complex – at first glance – cutting edge world of cryptocurrency investing, in order to make things as simple as possible. In writing this book I have a similar desire to when I wrote my guide on global warming, which was to try and make a topic which seems extremely complicated, much easier to understand. In all honesty, trying to clarify what is going on with global warming was a lot more complex, and took a great deal longer to research and simplify than writing this guide on cryptocurrencies.

 

So, before I get started on the nitty gritty of how to find your first coins, which coins to look out for, and how to buy them, I’ll set out a very brief introduction on the basic facts you might want to know about how this entire craze started. To do that, we need to look at the granddaddy of all cryptocurrency, Bitcoin.

 

Investing in cryptocurrencies has been said to be a generational wealth creator. That means, no other investment is likely to come along in the next 50 years or so that could potentially make you so wealthy, and so quickly as investing in cryptocurrency. And the great thing is, you only need to invest very small amounts, just $20 will do!

 

Cryptocurrencies and the blockchain will change the way we see the world. It cuts out the middlemen, cuts costs and is fast.

 

Fortunes will be made by corporations and individuals who are brave enough to get involved in this almost pioneering type of investing which is literally akin to panning for gold in the wild frontiers of the American Midwest.

 

I’m sure you are wondering; how much money have I made? Well, I can confirm at the time of publishing this book, my cryptocurrency portfolio of 15 different coins has increased by a massive 160%, in 7 weeks or so. Some of the best performing coins are listed below;

 

  • Tron – TRX purchased at 0.036, now 0.098 – up 169%
  • Zillika – ZIL purchased at 0506, now 0.1066 – up 110%
  • Refereum – RFR purchased at 0.007, now 0.012 – up 72%
  • BANCA – purchased at 0.002, now 0.003 – up 54%

 

The rises have been volatile, but at present, they are all heading up!

This book was written with the novice in mind, and also for those already knowledgeable about cryptocurrency.

If all this peaks your interest, then read on!

Purchase on Amazon.com

Purchase on Amazon.co.uk

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3 Apr

MELT ZONE…coming 7th April to Amazon… get ready for adventure…

SimonRosserAuthor Blog

MELT ZONE COVER 9

In 1938 the German New Swabia Expedition left Hamburg for Antarctica aboard the MS Schwabenland. The secret expedition arrived at the Princess Martha Coast, in an area which had been claimed by Norway as Dronning Maud Land, and began charting the region. Nazi German flags were placed on the sea ice along the coast…75 years later, something very odd is discovered…

RAPID ANTARCTIC ICE MELT…

Just before Europe’s Envisat satellite malfunctions, it photographs a mysterious melt zone during a fly-over of Eastern Antarctica. Following analysis of the photographs, the UKs GLENCOM – Global Environmental Command – Unit, sends three of its climatologists to investigate, but as they analyse the site, a vast crevasse opens in the ice, swallowing them up. They survive the fall, but make a startling and lethal discovery.

A HUNT ACROSS EUROPE…

GLENCOM agent and environmental lawyer, Robert Spire, has his Austrian skiing holiday interrupted following…

View original post 5,617 more words

Statistics for December and 2012 – is the UK getting wetter?

4 Jan

Official blog of the Met Office news team

Provisional statistics from the Met Office show 2012 was the second wettest year in the UK national record dating back to 1910, and just a few millimetres short of the record set in 2000.

The exceptionally wet year was characterised by a dry start which quickly gave way to very wet weather, with April and June both being the wettest on record.

Unsettled weather continued through to the end of the year, with December being the 8th wettest on record for the UK.

Throughout the year, accurate forecasts and warnings from the Met Office have helped everyone across the UK plan and prepare for the worst impacts of the extremely wet weather we have seen.

The persistent wet weather resulted in total 2012 rainfall for the UK of 1330.7 mm, which is just 6.6 mm short of the record set in 2000.

Looking at individual countries, 2012 was the wettest…

View original post 390 more words

Tipping Point Action-adventure thriller – Intro Chapters

30 Jul

TIPPING POINT

 

 

SI ROSSER

 

SCHMALL WORLD PUBLISHING

 

TIPPING POINT

 

“The point at which the number of small changes over a period of time reaches a level where a further small change has a sudden and very great effect on a system…”

 

Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary

 

For Zuzana

 

 

 

 

PROLOGUE

April 5

 

 

 

 

“ONLY ANOTHER FOUR of these trips and we’re done,” Davenport shouted to his friend, as he looked back at the jagged cliffs rising out of the ocean on the bleak leeward side of the Ile de l’Est.

“Thank God! Don’t ever ask me to sign up for anything like this again. After the year we’ve spent down here, I’m sure we’ll both be exempt from having to do any further voluntary research for a while,” Hawthorn replied.

Dawn was just breaking over the windswept isles, as the old wooden fishing boat chugged out of the make-shift port on Ile de l’Est, one of six islets that make up the French Crozet Islands in the Southern Indian Ocean. The sub-Antarctic archipelago – part of the French Southern Territories since 1955 – was uninhabited, except for a small research base on the main island, Ile de la Possession.

“You know Adam, I could think of better things to be doing during my gap year. Monitoring penguins and sea creatures doesn’t feature high on the list,” Hawthorn said, turning the boat towards the sampling zone.

“Don’t forget it’s your turn to update the catalogue with whatever marine samples we find,” Davenport shouted, throwing the well-used notebook across the deck to his friend.

Adam Davenport and James Hawthorn had been based on the main island, Ile de la Possession, along with five other research scientists for the last eight months, and were now embarking on the final four months of their placement as part of an international monitoring team, studying the many different species of penguins, seals, birds, flora and fauna unique to the archipelago. The islands were in fact one large nature reserve, since being declared a national park back in 1938. The two researchers felt long forgotten by the outside world. The monthly food drop, by small plane from the French Kerguelen islands – some thirteen hundred kilometres to the east – was their only real comfort.

The boat’s bow rose up on the crest of a wave as they motored out of the protected inlet toward Ile de la Possession, and the buoy that marked the research area, some two kilometres out from the eastern shore.

“It sure is calm out today,” Davenport said, looking out over the horizon. A group of five petrels circled above the boat as they arrived at the marker buoy. Hawthorn cut the engine, letting the boat drift toward the orange buoy. “Pass the rope so I can tie her up,” he yelled.

Davenport threw him the frayed end of the rope, which he secured to the chain on the buoy. The boat bobbed up and down on the light swell as Davenport went to retrieve his packet of Marlboro’s from the wheelhouse. “How many pots are we supposed to be pulling up today James?” He shouted over to his friend.

“Looks like we dropped eight overboard last week,” Hawthorn replied, flicking through the scruffy, worn notepad which dated back to the 1960s. “It’s going to look like seafood pick and mix by the time we haul them all up.”

Davenport lent over the side of the boat, taking in a deep breath of sea air. He pulled a Marlboro from the packet, licked the end of it, and placed it between his lips. “There’s a very strange smell on the port side,” he shouted to Hawthorn, who was getting the sampling kits ready to drop overboard.

He flipped the top of his Zippo lighter open and struck the flint. Before Hawthorn could answer him, a flash of light and heat exploded around them, completely engulfing the wooden fishing boat.

Hawthorn felt the force of the explosion as he was thrown into the shattered wheelhouse, followed by an instant of agonizing pain, then darkness.

Davenport opened his eyes. He was in the water, surrounded by flotsam and covered in burning oil. He tried to swim through it, but the task was futile. He screamed, and dived under the water. The last thing he felt was a searing pain in his lungs as he sank into the freezing depths.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER 1

London, April 15

 

 

 

 

DR. DALE STANTON sat at his desk in the darkening room of his Russell Square apartment staring blankly at the glowing computer screen, his eyes tired and sore. His face was impassive, except for the visible, nervous twitch in the corner of his mouth, which revealed his gathering thoughts.

He was putting the finishing touches to the presentation that he would be giving to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change conference in Oslo, Norway, in a little under a week’s time. Stanton had been working on his current project for almost eight months, and the conclusions he’d reached, he had little doubt, would concern the scientific world. Reaching over, he turned on the desktop lamp and rubbed his eyes, before leaning back in his chair to stretch his aching neck.

Looking back at the monitor, he started reading over the salient parts of his presentation to check it one final time before finishing for the evening. He resumed typing; making what he hoped was the final amendment to his paper.

We know the Ocean Thermohaline Circulation is an important Atlantic current powered by both heat ( thermo) and salt ( haline ) which brings warm water up from the tropics to northern latitudes. Without it, the Eastern Seaboard of the USA and climate of Northern Europe would be much colder. I have been re-analysing all the data amassed by the RAPID-WATCH program and my calculations reveal that the measuring devices have been incorrectly calibrated. Twenty-five of the thirty devices used to measure ocean flow were set by the manufacturers to measure fresh water. When calibrating the data to factor in measurements for denser salt water, the figures revealed…

Stanton jumped, as the telephone on his desk rang. He took a deep breath, and sighed as he reached over his laptop to pick up the phone. “Hello!” There was no answer. “Hello!” Again, silence. He replaced the receiver. His train of thought interrupted, he sat quietly for a moment before completing the final sentence, then saved the amendments and closed the program down. He clicked on his private finance folder to check an insurance policy he knew was about to expire, and as he did, accidentally opened the file containing a copy of his will. Perusing it, he reminded himself to amend the charitable legacies clause in order to make a gift to the team down at RAPID. God knows, they would need all the help they could get.

He’d had the will prepared after receiving a large sum of money from his father two years earlier. A colleague had recommended a local firm specialising in environmental law with a promise that one of the firm’s senior environmental lawyers, a Mr. Robert Spire would be appointed as a co-executor. He closed the file, reminding himself to have the will amended when he returned from Oslo next week.

Stanton reached across his desk and pulled the research book he’d been using from the shelf to double check a couple of facts. He flicked through the pages to a section entitled The Younger Dryas period. Around 12,900 years ago – just as the world was slowly warming up after the last ice age – a rapid descent back to colder conditions occurred in as little as ten years or so, a mere blink of an eye, in climactic terms. A shut down of the Atlantic Ocean Thermohaline Circulation was thought to have been a possible cause of the rapid chill. Stanton’s hair stood up on the back of his neck as he considered the possible ramifications of his latest research.

He closed the book, turned off his laptop, and ran his hands through his lank brown hair. As he got up from his desk, he looked out of his window at a deserted Russell Square and closed the blinds. He realised he’d been working for almost six hours, and it was now coming up to five P.M on Saturday evening.

He enjoyed living alone in his two-bed terraced townhouse apartment in London’s Russell Square, one of only a few private residences left overlooking the park. He had noticed various businesses, as well as the University College of London taking over most of the area during the last twenty years. The district was dotted with restaurants and bars, and in a couple of hours he would be meeting up with an old friend for a well-earned drink in the Hotel Russo, not far from his apartment.

He briefly took hold of the memory stick containing his presentation, before putting it back down gently. The facts, figures and details of his paper were spinning around in his head. He knew he wouldn’t be able to relax until he had given his talk in Oslo. He’d been over the calculations at least ten times to ensure they were correct. He walked into the bathroom. Unbelievable; how could they have failed to check the calibration on the measuring equipment?

Just as he was about to get in the shower, the phone rang again. He picked up the receiver, “Hello!” There was silence on the other end. As he replaced the phone he heard a click on the line. Not again. He shrugged, and stepped under the shower.

Stanton was in the middle of drying himself when a text message came through from Mathew confirming the arrangements. They would be meeting in the Kings Bar at the Hotel Russo; a warm intimate wood-panelled bar, and one of his favourite local watering holes. He finished drying and put on a white linen shirt and glanced in the mirror. He looked and felt tired. He splashed some aftershave on his face, locked the door to the apartment and headed down the hall stairs and wandered out into the warmth of a mild spring evening.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER 2

 

 

 

 

THE HOTEL RUSSO was situated just five minutes from Stanton’s apartment on the opposite side of Russell Square. The park, one of the square’s main features looked empty, but the early evening traffic was picking up, a mixture of late night shoppers and taxis, collecting and dropping off their fares…

Interesting in reading more? Please click Amazon UK or Amazon USA to get taken to book’s home page.

Thanks for reading, Si Rosser.